1887
Volume 22 Number 1
  • E-ISSN: 1365-2478

Abstract

A

First, we review briefly the principle of the method, the computation of theoretical curves for a layered earth, and the recording technique in use in our surveys.

The case history deals with an area covered with overthrust nappes (marls of Miocene age), which had slid on a Triassic sole, obscuring the geological picture.

The magnetotelluric survey followed those of gravity and aeromagnetics and preceded the seismic one from North to South, it displayed a shallow and gently dipping basin, a major fault system, and a deep basin with a thick resistive layer, often underlying a conducting one.

The seismics, and later the drilling of a well East of the profile, confirmed these features; in particular, the thick resistive layer was revealed to be Jurassic; only its thickness had been slightly overestimated. This fact lead the people in charge of the operations to ask for a reinterpretation synthesis of magnetotellurics, seismics and gravity, the results of which are also presented.

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2006-04-27
2020-03-31
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References

  1. Cagniard, L., 1953, Basic theory of the magnetotelluric method: Geophysics, 18, 605–635.
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  2. Cagniard, L., 1953a, Principe de la méthode magnéto‐tellurique, Nouvelle méthode de prospection géophysique: Annales de Géophysique, 9, 95–125.
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  3. D'Erceville, I. and Kunetz, G., 1962, The effect of a fault on the earth's natural electromagnetic field: Geophysics, 27, 651–665.
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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