1887
Volume 25, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 1354-0793
  • E-ISSN:

Abstract

Cretaceous Mesaverde Group sandstones contain opening-mode fractures lined or filled by quartz and, locally, calcite cement. Fracture occlusion by quartz is controlled primarily by fracture size, age and thermal history. Fracture occlusion by calcite is highly heterogeneous, with open and calcite-sealed fractures found at adjacent depths. In the Piceance and in other basins, processes that control the distribution of these calcite cements have been uncertain. Using pore and fracture cement petrography, fluid inclusions, and isotopic and elemental analysis, we show that host-rock calcite distribution and remobilization govern porosity degradation and occlusion of fractures >1 mm wide by calcite. Fluid-inclusion analyses indicate calcite cement precipitation at 135–165°C. Sr/Sr ratios of calcite and the presence of porous albite suggest that detrital feldspar albitization released Ca, driving carbonate cement precipitation. In host rock, both albite and calcite content decreases with depth along with greater fracture porosity preservation. Although the cement sequence Fe-dolomite → ankerite → calcite is widespread, Fe-dolomite and ankerite occur as host-rock cements only, with detrital dolomite as preferred precipitation substrate. We find that the rock-mass calcite cement content correlates with fracture degradation and occlusion, and can be used to accurately predict where wide fractures are sealed or open.

This article is part of the Naturally Fractured Reservoirs collection available at: https://www.lyellcollection.org/cc/naturally-fractured-reservoirs

Companion
This article is accompanied by the following content:
Genesis and role of bitumen in fracture development during early catagenesis
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This article is accompanied by the following content:
Multiscale fracture length analysis in carbonate reservoir units, Kurdistan, NE Iraq
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This article is accompanied by the following content:
Flow diagnostics for naturally fractured reservoirs
Companion
This article is accompanied by the following content:
Introduction to the thematic collection: Naturally Fractured Reservoirs
Companion
This article is accompanied by the following content:
Multiscale fracture length analysis in carbonate reservoir units, Kurdistan, NE Iraq
Companion
This article is accompanied by the following content:
Flow diagnostics for naturally fractured reservoirs
Companion
This article is accompanied by the following content:
Introduction to the thematic collection: Naturally Fractured Reservoirs
Companion
This article is accompanied by the following content:
Genesis and role of bitumen in fracture development during early catagenesis
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