1887
Volume 5, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 1569-4445
  • E-ISSN: 1873-0604

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Ground‐penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are frequently used to delineate the distribution of subsurface water. This paper demonstrates that GPR is suitable for detecting water leakage from underground construction areas because it produces detailed images of changes in water‐level that are related to water leaks. For this experiment, we used a test pit filled with river sand and a buried mortar wall that divides the pit into two sections. To simulate water leaks, we drilled holes through the mortar wall at a depth of 1.15 m and maintained constant water levels of 1.4 m and 0.4 m below the surface on each side of the wall. Water‐levels were controlled by pump‐extraction and injection using water‐control wells. Variations in water‐level under dynamic hydraulic conditions caused by water leakage through the holes were delineated by dense GPR single‐fold profiling measurements. Wide‐angle reflection and refraction (WARR) measurements were also performed to obtain velocity information and to support the interpretation of profiling data. To image minor changes in waterlevel accurately, we took minor topographic changes into account and applied finite‐difference method migration and time‐variant depth conversion to the GPR single‐fold profiling data. We were able to construct a three‐dimensional water‐level map using the water‐table depths extracted from migrated depth sections. Our results clearly demonstrate a rising trend in water‐level approaching the mortar wall, indicating water leakage from the drilled holes. In addition, the WARR data confirmed that the upward trend in water‐level continues to the mortar wall; it was not possible to image this trend on the single‐fold profiling section within 0.5–1 m of the mortar wall because of interference from measuring equipment buried close to the wall.

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2007-03-01
2020-04-04
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