1887
Volume 8, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 1569-4445
  • E-ISSN: 1873-0604

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper is to image particularly buried archaeological remains with a new technique for 3D display in the Temple of Augustus () relating to the Roman time, around and in Agora in the Ulus district of Ankara, Turkey. 2D ground‐penetrating radar (GPR) data were acquired on constant spaced parallel profiles in the study area. After data processing, a 3D data volume was built using a parallel 2D data set. The full data block was divided into sub‐data blocks in time. A weak amplitude range was made invisible with zero opaque by applying zero opacity to these values in the visualization. The arranged visible maximum amplitude range was enlarged or the amplitude scale was weighted with a constant coefficient, which was greater than one and smaller than two and had a decimal number, according to the time range. In this way, a transparent 3D image was obtained for determining buried remains according to the depth range. Interactive visualization was carried out by constructing sub‐blocks of the transparent 3D volume.

The interactive transparent 3D visualization was provided to identify the archaeological remains on native locations with depth in a 3D volume. Very complex and deep wall structures were visualized with any depth range inside (cella) of the Temple of Augustus and a few very narrow cubic anomalies exceeding 4 m deep were determined at the East side of the temple. An excavation could not be carried out in the cella because of the sensitivity problem of the cella walls. However, excavations in front of the East wall of the temple encouraged the new 3D image results. In addition, a lot of iron clamps connecting wall marble stones were determined on a profile gathered on the East wall.

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/content/journals/10.3997/1873-0604.2010028
2010-07-01
2019-12-06
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