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Abstract

An estimated 110 million landmines, mostly antipersonnel mines laid in over 60<br>countries, kill or maim over 26,000 people a year. One of the dilemmas for removing landmines<br>is the amount of false alarms in a typical minefield. Broadband electromagnetic induction<br>spectroscopy (EMIS), however, is a promising technology that can both detect and identify<br>buried objects as landmines. By reducing the number of false alarms, this approach significantly<br>reduces costs associated with landmine removal. Combining the EMIS technology and a<br>broadband EM1 sensor, the scientific phenomenology that has potential applications for<br>identifying landmines, unexploded ordnance, and hidden weapons at security checkpoints can<br>now be explored.

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/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609-pdb.200.2000_091
2000-02-20
2021-12-01
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609-pdb.200.2000_091
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