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Abstract

The Eagle Ford Shale is one of the most active U.S. shale plays; it produces oil, gas condensate, and dry gas. To better understand the regional and vertical variations of reservoir properties and their effects on fluid types and well performance, we conducted an integrated, regional study using production and well log data. Maps of the average gas-oil ratio (GOR) of the first three production months identified four fluid regions, including black oil, volatile oil, gas condensate, and dry gas regions. Maximum oil production occurs in Karnes County, where first-month oil production of most wells exceeds 5,000 barrels (bbl). The most productive gas region is between the Stuart City and Sligo Shelf Margins, where first-month gas production of most wells exceeds 60 million cubic feet (MMcf). Eagle Ford Shale petrophysical properties were analyzed in individual wells and were mapped to clarify the regionally variations of Eagle Ford Shale reservoir properties and their controls on fluid types and well performance. In comparison to the upper Eagle Ford, the lower Eagle Ford Shale has high gamma ray, high resistivity, low density, and long transit time values; we infer that the lower Eagle Ford shale has higher total organic carbon and lower carbonate content than the upper Eagle Ford Shale. Integration of production and geological data shows that thermal maturity and structural setting of the Eagle Ford Shale strongly influence fluid types and production rates. Plots of GOR vs. time for individual wells were constant in different reservoir fluids. Results of this study clarify causes of vertical and lateral heterogeneity in the Eagle Ford shale and the regional extents of fluid types. Understanding of the reservoir property differences between upper and lower Eagle Ford Shale should assist with optimizing completion design and stimulation strategies. The results may be applicable to similar developing shale plays.

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/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609-pdb.350.iptc16808
2013-03-26
2021-10-26
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609-pdb.350.iptc16808
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