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Abstract

So far, one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) techniques have dominated resistivity surveying, and the latter only in recent years, while three dimensional (3D) techniques are still in their infancy. In order to build images of the 3D resistivity distribution of the ground, it is today common practice to merge the result from a number of sections acquired and inverted using 2D resistivity imaging techniques, which may be referred to as a quasi-3D technique.

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/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609.201407298
1997-08-09
2020-10-26
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609.201407298
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