1887

Abstract

Summary

The heterogeneous nature of shales arising from their sheer abundance in the natural world, presents a unique challenge to the field of characterisation. Shales vary significantly in terms of their age, composition and pore systems so the wide-range applicability of a study on just one shale is questionable. This uncertainty can be reduced through the use of analogous materials, such as pure carbons and clay minerals, which can make shale characterisation much more predictive. In this work, we characterise the Bowland shale in the UK. Three samples, taken at different depths, and of varying composition in terms of organic content and clay minerals, were studied. Characterisation was achieved using low pressure adsorption on N2 at 77K and CO2 at 273K. The results were complemented with the use of the same technique performed on pure components such as mesoporous carbon (representing the organic matter) and clay minerals. The pure material results are used to infer the independent contribution of the constituents to shale characteristics and can be used to build artificial isotherms. Results show that the shale composition is a key indicator of the pore space in shale and therefore adsorption capacity and gas storage potential.

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/content/papers/10.3997/2214-4609.201900274
2019-04-28
2020-06-05
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